Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:15am
Emerson Thoreau rooms
Our complex world wracked with fear and war must find a way out of this quagmire. What is revolution and is it part of evolution? What forms can evolution take in human society? What are the solutions that you believe possible? Is it possible for a society to decay? Bring your tired souls that yearn to be free— Earl Scott will lead a discussion of social and political revolution.
Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:30am
Susan B. Anthony room
Learn about the inner workings of a 21st century school and how you might become a part of a school's village from the Principal of Kimberly Park Elementary School.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:30am
Susan B. Anthony room
As shocking as the recent separation and displacement of immigrant families has been, it has numerous precedents all-too-familiar to Native Americans. Wake Forest University anthropologist Dr. Margaret Bender specializes in the language and culture of Cherokee Indians.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:15am
Emerson Thoreau rooms
Seven time burners Christine & Jim Toole will talk about the immersive Art of Burning Man and the ways the event continues to transform their lives. This interactive discussion will be framed by the 10 principles of Burning Man: radical inclusion; gifting; de-commodification; radical self-reliance; radical self-expression; communal effort; civic responsibility; leaving no trace; participation; and immediacy.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:30am
Susan B. Anthony room
The separation of families is nothing new. It has been a fact of life for Native Americans and African Americans since the Colonial Period, and it has had lasting, harmful consequences. Prof. Bender is a member of the Wake Forest University Anthropology Department.