Pride, ReImagined: The Radical Potential of Queer Liberation

Sunday, 10.14.2018
Speaker: 
Angela Mazaris, Ph.D.
What would it look like if we thought of LGBTQ Pride not just as a celebration, but as a tool for re-imagining our world? Dr. Angela Mazaris leads us on an adventure to envision a world in which queer liberation is a road to everyone's salvation. Dr. Mazaris is a Fellowship member, and the founding director of the LGBTQ Center at Wake Forest University, where they also teach in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program.

Pride, ReImagined: The Radical Potential of Queer Liberation

Sunday, 10.14.2018
Speaker: 
Angela Mazaris, Ph.D.
What would it look like if we thought of LGBTQ Pride not just as a celebration, but as a tool for re-imagining our world? Dr. Angela Mazaris leads us on an adventure to envision a world in which queer liberation is a road to everyone's salvation. Dr. Mazaris is a Fellowship member, and the founding director of the LGBTQ Center at Wake Forest University, where they also teach in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program.

Indigenous Wisdom, Modern Science

Sunday, 10.7.2018
Speaker: 
Mariela Pérez-Simons
Celebrate Indigenous People's Day! Ministerial Intern Mariela Pérez-Simons will explore the intersection of indigenous wisdom and modern neuroscience. What can we learn from indigenous cultures (particularly from the Taino people who Columbus first encountered) about connection, belonging, and the flourishing of humanity and all living things?

The Courage to Be Countercultural

Sunday, 09.23.2018
Speaker: 
The Rev. Lisa Romantum Schwartz
“What are they worth?” The question might be asked of neighbors, friends, or family members, and reflects a common association of financial wealth with a person’s value. Some have called the current era “The New Gilded Age,” in which displays of wealth often masquerade as demonstrations of worth. People of faith are challenged to disentangle “value” and “assets,” and assert our countercultural claims about how to live a meaningful life.

Stay Woke

Sunday, 09.16.2018
Speaker: 
The Rev. Sherman Z. Logan
The results of the last Presidential election awakened many people to the plight of those who felt marginalized, neglected and ignored. While some people are reaping benefits from the policies of this current administration, two years later there are still thousands of voices that are not being heard. There are many who are feeling hopeless and are in deep despair. The good news there is still hope for things to get better in the beloved community, only if we “Stay Woke”! Guest preacher Rev. Sherman Z. Logan, Jr. currently serves as the Executive Minister of the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Richmond, VA, where he has been on staff for a decade. Rev. Logan earned a BA degree in Sociology from the University of Virginia, and a Master of Divinity from the Samuel D. Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University. He holds dual ordination in the Baptist and Unitarian Universalist traditions.

Where Do We Come From?

Sunday, 08.19.2018
Speaker: 
Mariela Pérez-Simons
Our Fellowship has embraced the role of Teaching Congregation by hiring a half-time intern who will serve our congregation from August through May for the next two years. Mariela Pérez-Simons, Meadville-Lombard Theological School's Presidential Scholar, is familiar to many of us already through her work with the Fellowship, but this is her first official Sunday as our intern. In her sermon she explores issues of identity (how her Cuban roots shape her), the arc of personal development (how she is being formed by Theological Education), and a vision for the future (what ministry might be like in the future, and how our Fellowship will help shape it).

Prohibition, Propaganda and Political Power

Sunday, 07.29.2018
Speaker: 
Dr. James S. Campbell, M.D.
Mind-altering substances have been used by humankind since the dawn of time, with both good and bad effects. Only since the early 1800's, however, have they been used as a tool for racist oppression. This sermon explores how this took place, and briefly discusses what can be done to reduce the racist component of drug prohibition. Guest speaker, Dr. James Campbell, has practiced on the front lines of medicine for over 45 years, and just retired last year. Besides his general medical practice, he is also a biomedical engineer who has had his medical device designs approved for human use by the FDA. He has studied the deleterious effects of drug prohibition on the practice of medicine for over 50 years, and presents some highlights of his findings.

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